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Mirror Mirror…

JM2

Something very dark has decided to make an early appearance this Halloween, bursting from the cold, dead earth of the local cemetery…

I’ll have to wait until midnight and try to rebury this gruesome treasure.

It isn’t due to be born until January 2015!

But you can preorder it by clicking this link

 

MARVEL Heroes Help To Stomp Out Bullying!

Hi guys

My next book, JEKYLL’S MIRROR, will be coming out in January and a central theme of the story is cyberbullying. With every book I write, I feel that it’s really important to research the characters and the situations they’re in so that, although the story might be fantastical or supernatural, the problems of the characters seem real.

starlord

For Jekyll, I had to do some very upsetting research into cyberbullying. Now, I was very badly bullied while I was at secondary school, but this was in the dusty old days before the internet (yes, there really was such a time!). The bullying I suffered was horrible. It made me feel scared and humiliated and worthless. But at least I knew, when I went home from school, the bullying would stop.

In the modern world bullying doesn’t always stop when children go home. It can happen to them virtually twenty-four hours a day. The reasons why and the consequences of this I tried to explore in Jekyll’s Mirror, and it gave me a real understanding and sympathy for victims.

That is why I’m thrilled that the brilliant MARVEL COMICS has taken this issue head-on by supporting the STOMP OUT BULLYING organisation in the United States. Check out this link to see the Hulk, Captain America, Starlord, Rocket Racoon and Gamora all supporting the campaign against cyberbullying. Not only is it super-cool in a geeky way (GEEKS RULE!) but it highlights a serious issue.

hulk

If you’re reading this in the UK and you’re suffering from bullying of any kind, there are lots of places you can get help and advice. Check out the links below:

http://www.childline.org.uk/

http://www.bullying.co.uk/cyberbullying/

http://www.beatbullying.org/

http://www.cybersmile.org/

Ghoulish Goings On At St George’s College!

Hello all

Before the summer holidays I visited the brilliant St George’s College in Weybridge. Mr Waight kindly wrote up this report of the events for the school newsletter and has allowed me to reproduce it here (names of students have been removed due to school policy):

‘On July 3, author William Hussey visited St George’s College to give three presentations. He started the day by discussing the writer’s craft with the Sixth Form English students, followed this with a terrifying mock witch trial with the First Years and finally gave a haunting talk on the Gothic genre to the Second Years.

The First Year students were immediately engaged by William’s presence, learning how he became interested in writing and the historical events surrounding witchcraft in Civil War Britain. Having been educated on the traditional instruments used by witchfinders of the time, including the terrifying bodkin, the students were ready for their very own witch trial. [student name] was the unfortunate student accused of being a witch – and with the help of townsfolk, his fate – guilty! – was sealed by the jury of 120 first years.

When the Second Years arrived in the afternoon, they were given a brief history of the horror story before William focused on the classic novel ‘Dracula’, dispelling certain myths about vampires – Stoker’s original creation CAN walk in sunlight. This was followed by the ultimate battle: Dracula versus Van Helsing.

In all three sessions, the students were totally engaged with William, which is testament to his fantastic public speaking ability. All of the lower school students were treated to a reading from one of William’s books, where new meaning was given to the phrase ‘bringing words to life’. The students asked thought-provoking and interesting questions once each presentation was completed, although the Second Years did have a strange obsession with discovering William’s favourite horror film (The Shining).

The students and staff at St George’s are incredibly grateful to William for giving up his time. The queue of students lining up to purchase a signed copy of his novels speaks volumes as to the impact that William had on his young listeners. The event was a roaring success and was described by Mrs Rowlatt, Head of English, as: “thoroughly entertaining and spine-chilling; William Hussey has the gift of stimulating and surprising his audience in equal measure”.

KESWICK SCHOOL WRITING CLUB PUBLISHES BOOK!

Front cover

Last year, during my schools tour for Haunted, I was lucky enough to be invited into Keswick School in Cumbria. After performing my Gothic Masterclass I was invited by Mrs Robinson to take a tour of the school library. Straight away I could tell that the students of Keswick were a creative bunch for the walls and bookcases were teeming with sculptures and other pieces of art depicting favourite literary characters.

While chatting to Mrs Robinson, I discovered that there was a very active writing group within the school (see their website here) and that they had been collaborating on a real book! Mrs Robinson gave me a rough copy of this magnificent tome and it accompanied me from Scotland to Bristol during the tour.

The essential idea for the story is depictions of history and historical characters, some famous some not, which are seen through the character of ‘The Book’ itself: a wonderful and innovative conceit. The more I read the more I became engrossed in this brilliant act of collective storytelling and, returning home, fired off an email to praise to Mrs Robinson and her students. A little time later I heard that the group were hoping to publish THE READER properly, and I gave a few tips to get them started.

Well, I’m delighted to share the news that the book has indeed been published! Fellow writer Jim Eldridge commented on the finished product saying ‘This pooling of talents creates a book that is a sheer delight to read’ while my own words of praise can be found on the back cover.

Below, I’m printing the prologue to this very clever book, but before I do I’m very pleased to say you can buy the book from Mrs Robinson for the bargain price of £3.99! You will also get a free bookmark – what a bargain! Please, if you support young writers and want a thought-provoking, engrossing read, do drop Mrs Robinson a line at helenrobinson@keswick.cumbria.sch.uk

Click below to continue reading… THE READER!

Read the rest of this entry »

Turkish edition of Witchfinder!

Hello all

A quick post to share this amazing artwork for the Turkish edition of Witchfinder: Dawn of the Demontide. Isn’t it great?! I love the variation on the original cover, here with the infamous Demon Father reimagined as a Djinn-type figure. Many thanks to the brilliant people at Ithaki Publishing for this lovely (and terrifying) piece of art!

turkish

A Shout Out To Terrific Teachers & Their Crazily Creative Kids!

 

A creepy reading in the school hall – lights off, of course!

A quick post to say a BIG thank you to the children, the staff, and especially brilliant English teacher Miss Andrew of Christ’s Hospital School in Lincoln.

I always get a kick out of visiting schools with my events and workshops. Getting kids excited and engaged with reading and writing has been one of the unexpected joys of being a children’s author, and I think I speak for a lot of that crazy crew who write kids’ books when I say, although school visits can be exhausting, the buzz and energy we get from enthusing young people about stories sends us scurrying back to our keyboards, full of fresh zest and new ideas! (I also enjoy making whole assembly groups leap out of their skins at the JUMP! moments in my books, but that’s just my evil mastermind side speaking. Mwhahaha!)

hospital school

Christ’s Hospital School Library Display (thanks to the awesome librarian!)

Anyway, last Friday I had the pleasure of joining a group of very creative students at Christ’s Hospital and, over the course of an hour, we came up with a frankly terrifying idea for a zombie novel crossed with Les Misérables and touching on the issues of slavery! Brainstorming, the children devised a really interesting central character and the outline of a breathlessly exciting plot. I really hope they continue with it – I can’t wait to see how it turns out for Joe and his zombie friend Claire (or 24601 as Joe’s despicable dad calls her!).

You can find a fun report on the visit by clicking this link

Now, I don’t post after every school visit – it would get a bit repetitive if I did! – but I thought I’d take this opportunity to highlight the wonderful kids & staff at Christ’s Hospital and, in so doing, send out a big thank you to ALL the schools I’ve recently attended. Contrary to what we often read about in the press and see in certain TV documentaries, the teenagers I encounter up and down the country on a weekly basis are considerate, polite, engaged and VERY hardworking. Similarly, the teachers I work with (and enjoy cups of tea with in the staffroom) are tireless champions of education who put 110% (I was never good at maths!) into their work and care about each and every child they teach. So thank you again Christ’s Hospital, Miss Andrew, and all the teachers and pupils who’ve been so kind as to invite me into their school!

The Case of the Exsanguinated Sleuth

As promised, in honour of the return of Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss’ brilliant SHERLOCK, here is my cheeky Sherlock Holmes story… with a supernatural twist (Sherlockians, see if you can spot all the references to the Conan Doyle stories, and check out my previous post on Holmes and the supernatural below…)

sherlock3

Mr Sherlock Holmes, who was usually very late in the mornings, save upon those infrequent occasions when he was up all night, was seated at the breakfast table. I stood upon the hearthrug and picked up the article our visitor had left behind the night before. Embossed in deepest crimson upon the calling card was a gothic letter ‘D’.

“Well, Watson, what do you make of it?”

Holmes was sitting with his back to me, and I had given him no sign of my occupation.

“I believe you have eyes in the back of your head,” I remarked.

“I have at least a well-polished, silver-plated coffee pot in front of me,” said he, and touching the lid he let out a sharp hiss as if the scalding metal had burned his elegant fingers.

As my eyes shifted to the pot itself, Holmes reacted with lightning speed and threw his napkin over it. Still, I had a fancy that I had glimpsed something curious before the linen descended. I had the strange idea that, although the chair in which he sat had been reflected, the face and form of Sherlock Holmes was missing.

“Watson,” he said, dragging me from my reverie, “would you have any objection to drawing the blinds?”

“None at all.” I crossed the room, all the while keeping a concerned eye on my old friend. “Tell me, Holmes, are you afraid of something?”

“Well, I am.”

“Of what?” said I, shutting out the morning glare. “Not air-guns again!”

“No. I no longer fear… air-guns.”

The detective gave a dry chuckle and curled up in his chair, knees drawn to his jutting chin. Despite his good humour he was even more gaunt and pale than usual. I approached, took hold of his wrist and attempted to gauge his pulse. I could find none. Similar difficulties had frustrated me when examining him after one of his cocaine binges, the soporific effect of his customary seven-per-cent solution having depressed the rigour of his circulatory system. He did not protest as I rolled up his sleeve and checked for the telltale signs that his miserable addiction had been indulged. Again, I could find nothing. And then I noticed something very strange: there were two puncture wounds, but not upon his arm.

“What have you been doing to yourself, old fellow?” I exclaimed.

“Peace, Watson,” Holmes muttered. “You will be pleased to hear I have no further use for the cocaine bottle.”

“Hmn. Well, something very odd has happened since I saw you last. Perhaps it is all to do with your visitor of last night. I am sorry I could not be at your side, my practice is rather busy of late. But come, tell me about him.”

Holmes stretched his long legs towards the fire and a great shiver ran the course of his body.

“Can’t get warm for the life of me,” he said. “As to my client, he was a nobleman of eastern extraction. A Count, no less.”

“Indeed? Well, I suppose we have hosted hereditary kings of Bohemia in Baker Street before, but what did this illustrious client want with you?”

“A trifling, if puzzling, business of persecution. He arrived in the town of Whitby on the Yorkshire coast some weeks back and was immediately set upon by a ragtag band made up of a wild frontiersman, an asylum physician and the eldest son of one of our noble families.”

“Good God, what had the man done to attract the hostility of such an unlikely crew?”

“That is somewhat unclear,” said the detective. “He is a foreigner, of course, and that may have been against him from the first. The Count is of the opinion that, as dangerous as these men are, their leader poses a far greater threat to his safety.”

“Who is this other man?”

“A Dutch professor with a very particular idée fixe that borders upon insanity. He is, however, a brilliant fellow with half the letters in the alphabet after his name. This obsession with the Count and his ‘kind’, as the Professor in his narrow-mindedness might term them, has diverted him from his true calling as an expert in obscure diseases.”

“Prejudice is a horrid thing,” I said shortly.

“Indeed. There are some trees, Watson, which grow to a certain height, and then suddenly develop some unsightly eccentricity. You will often see it in humans.” At that last word an uncharacteristic expression of condescension passed across my friend’s features; a certain aloof inhumanity which chilled me strangely. “Whatever the cause,” he continued, “the man has begun to go wrong.” 

“Well, it seems a most interesting case,” I ventured.

Holmes smiled, and in that instant I had the uncanny impression that his teeth, particularly the canines, were of a peculiarly pointed, I might even say feral, appearance. In all the chronicles I had made of our adventures together, of all the sketches of his person contained therein, I had not remarked upon, for I did not remember ever observing, this singular feature before.

“Interesting indeed,” Holmes nodded, “though I remain sanguine as to the problems the mystery presents.”

“Well then,” said I, “shall I leave you to ruminate upon it?”

“No, Watson. I should like you to stay and give me your assistance in certain matters.”

Holmes’ eyes glowed with a sudden fire and he rose and slipped across the hearthrug. Within three steps he was at the door of our Baker Street sitting room, turning the key in the lock. Then he spun round and, fixing me with that peculiar smile, he said:

“Indeed, I fully expect this to be a three pint problem…”

With sincere apologies to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle & Bram Stoker!

 

No Ghosts Need Apply

 

The latest Holmes & Watson

The latest Holmes & Watson

In honour of the return of Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss’ brilliant Sherlock, I’ll be reprinting a cheeky short story from my back catalogue, a pastiche called THE ADVENTURE OF THE EXSANGUINATED SLEUTH. The story will be posted Monday, but first a discussion of that most rational of detectives and his attitude to my favourite genre, the supernatural…

The question I always get asked at signings and school events: what did you read when you were a kid? I then bore the audience to death (sometimes literally) with a huge list of favourite books and stories. Always at the very core of that list is the ‘canon’ of 56 short stories and 4 novellas that make up the adventures of Mr Sherlock Holmes.

Holmes was my first real literary passion, and I use the word ‘passion’seriously. Whenever I sat down with one of those stories, I found my young heart racing as I followed the Great Detective and his faithful companion and chronicler, Dr John H Watson (formerly of the 5th Northumberland Fusiliers) into the dingy alleys of Limehouse, over the hound-haunted moors of Devonshire and across the cantons of Switzerland, all the way to that fatal encounter at the Reichenbach Falls… (SPOILER ALERT)… and beyond!

From the age of 5 to 14, the cosy sitting room of 221b Baker Street was as familiar to me as my own bedroom. All I had to do was close my eyes to see Holmes’ Stradivarius violin propped up on his chair, his correspondence pinned to the mantelpiece with a jack knife, the tobacco-stuffed Persian slipper, that patriotic ‘VR’ done in bullet holes in the wall, Watson’s bull pup lounging on the hearthrug (probably poisoned by Holmes in one of his unethical experiments), a chalkboard covered in strange ‘dancing men’, and on the side table: a dark lantern, Watson’s service revolver and Holmes’ burglar kit all ready and waiting for the next thrilling adventure.

A lovely chill raced down my spine whenever those famous words – ‘The game’s afoot!’ – were uttered or when I read some wonderful line like: ‘Mr Holmes, they were the footprints of a gigantic hound…’

Of course, in the end (SPOILER ALERT!) there was no demonic hound haunting the Baskerville clan, just a big dopey dog covered in luminous paint. You see, unlike his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes was an arch rationalist who did not believe in the supernatural.

In The Hound of the Baskervilles, Holmes shrugs off the legend of the ghost dog as interesting only to ‘a collector of fairy tales’ while in The Sussex Vampire, another story that at the beginning seems to be dipping its toe into the world of mythical monsters, Holmes makes it clear that his work as a detective ‘must stand flat-footed upon the ground… No ghosts need apply’.

But despite Holmes’ scepticism, Watson’s accounts of their adventures together often contain a frisson of what might be called supernatural or uncanny terror, and despite this terror always being rationalised and made sense of at the end of the case, a hint of eerie impossibility seems to linger in the mind of the reader. Maybe this is because, very often, Holmes’ cases teeter on the edge of gothic literature, a sub-genre that was the first to treat the supernatural as a real threat and which did much to birth the detective story.

All of this, as I say, is by way of an introduction to my very short Sherlock Holmes story that will be appearing on the blog Monday. It’s a parody really, my way of poking a bit of fun at the Great Detective’s insistence that ‘no ghosts need apply’…

HAUNTED & WITCHFINDER: INCREDIBLE KINDLE DEALS!

So… There are Hussey Horror deals galore on Kindle!!!

You can get my new book HAUNTED and WITCHFINDER: DAWN OF THE DEMONTIDE for just 99p!

AND you can get my chilling short story, TURN HER FACE TO THE WALL, for absolutely NOTHING! Yup, completely FREE!

This Macabre Madness will have to end soon, so snap ‘em up while you can. You might event choose to give these bargain horror books as gifts as part of Neil Gaiman’s brilliant All Hallows Read project!

Just click on the covers below and you’ll get around 150,000 words worth of terror for just 99! (OK, enough with the exclamation marks!!!)

Haunted-5 front only

Witchfinder_-_Dawn_of_the_Demontide[1]

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Tour Stuff #1: An Evening of Ghost Stories

Hello All

Well, I’m back from the very exhausting but VERY rewarding Haunted tour! 1,600 miles, dozens of schools, and plenty of scares later, and part of me wishes I could do it all over again! I met so many great people on my trek around the UK – brilliant booksellers, terrific teachers, stupendous students, as well as that crazily creative crew at Seven Stories (see the post below).

I could write and write about my experiences, filling paragraph after paragraph with funny stories and intriguing anecdotes, but I’ve decided to rest my typing fingers (I really need to get back to writing books!) and select nugget-size chunks of cool stuff to share.

The first is this amazing poster and tickets from my ‘Evening of Ghost Stories’ event at Lostock Hall Academy! (Click images for larger views)

Lostock Hall

Lostocj Hall

(‘An Evening of Ghost Stories’ is my brand new after-schools event, designed, in part, to get parents more involved in school life. Details of this new event can be found at my School Visits page here.)

At the kind invitation of Head of English, Mrs Butterworth, I took this new event into the wonderful Lostock Hall Academy. The school hall had been suitably decorated with spider webs, tarantulas and bats (plastic, thankfully!), and all manner of creepy accessories. The evening kicked off with an introductory speech from Mrs Butterworth welcoming parents into the school and highlighting the different activities in which the children were engaged.

Then we were treated to some particularly spine-tingling readings from the school’s ‘Community Readers.’

I was waiting in the stage’s darkened wings (the lights had been turned low in the auditorium and the shadows had gathered), listening to these courageous young people reading extracts from their favourite scary stories. We had pieces from classics like Dracula, Frankenstein and Edgar Allan Poe’s The Raven, as well as exciting contemporary extracts from Darren Shan and other fresh voices in horror. I must say, these pupils read their pieces beautifully – I’m not sure I’d have been brave enough to perform to a packed hall when I was their age! We were then treated to a charming and suitably haunting song from a young lady who, I believe, really ought to try out for The X Factor!

Then it was my turn at the podium. Echoing a line from Edgar Allan Poe’s The Raven, I suggested that we were no longer sitting in Lostock Hall’s auditorium but had been transported to a ‘home by horror haunted’ and that the audience ought to keep repeating to themselves: It’s only a story, only a story, only a story…

I performed a dramatic reading from MR James’ ‘Oh Whistle and I’ll Come To You’, then two tales from my own pen. I’m happy to report the audience screeched and jumped out of their skins in all the right places! The atmosphere was just right, with pupils from throughout the school chaperoning their nervous parents into the hall and then laughing along with them as those spooked-out mums and dads leaped out of their seats during the scary bits!

After the readings the school had organised a charity raffle. I think the best part of the evening was the community atmosphere generated by the event. It was great to see parents, pupils and teachers all brought together for the evening in an environment where parents could learn more about the school and feel more included in their children’s education.

So a huge thank you to Mrs Butterworth and all the staff and pupils at Lostock Hall. I was very gratified to receive this message from Mrs Butterworth after the visit:

‘Just wanted to say thank you for a fantastic day and for your  breath-taking readings . Your impact on our pupils’ enthusiasm for reading was tangible.’ What greater compliment can a writer receive?